FAQ

 

  1. Why choose a Registered Marriage and Family Therapist (RMFT)?
  2. What distinguishes Family Therapists from other mental health professionals?
  3. What is the difference between a Marriage and Family Therapist and a Social Worker?
  4. Must I be married to see a Marriage and Family Therapist?
  5. Can you treat one person with the family therapy process?
  6. Who pays for Registered Marriage and Family Therapist services?
  7. How long will therapy take?
  8. How do I contact Richard Langston?
  9. Find a Therapist in you area.
10. Search for additional resources on family therapy and other family-related issues.

Why choose a Registered Marriage and Family Therapist (RMFT)?
Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) is a distinct mental health discipline which utilizes family systems theories and intervention techniques, and is one of the five core mental health professions: marriage and family therapy, psychiatry, psychology, social work and psychiatric nursing.

Registered Marriage and Family Therapists (RMFT) are family-focused psychotherapists. They are relationship specialists and mental health generalists, and are trained to help individuals, couples, and families resolve personal and work related problems. Members have training in the development stages of personal, family and relationship growth. RMFT’s are held to the demanding Code of Ethics of The American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) and are Clinical Members of the AAMFT, the Ontario Association of Marriage and Family Therapist (OAMFT), and the Registry of Marriage and Family Therapists in Canada.

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2. What distinguishes Family Therapists from other mental health professionals?

Marriage and family therapy is a distinct professional discipline with graduate and post graduate programs. A Registered Marriage and Family Therapist, as a clinical member of the AAMFT or the OAMFT, will have one of three accreditations: master’s degree (2-3 years), doctoral program (3-5 years), or post-graduate clinical training programs (3-4 years). Historically, marriage and family therapists have come from a wide variety of educational backgrounds including psychology, psychiatry, social work, nursing, pastoral counseling and education.

Family Therapists are trained in various modes of therapy in order to prepare them for work with families, couples, groups and individuals. The training of a RMFT includes live supervision by an experienced RMFT, which is unique among the mental health disciplines.

You may go to the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) website for more on the qualifications and additional FAQs of a Marriage and Family Therapist.

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3. What is the difference between a Marriage and Family Therapist and a Social Worker?

The difference begins with the type of education.  Marriage and Family Therapist hold a master’s or doctoral degree and an addition two years of supervised clinical experience.  A Clinical Social Worker also holds a master’s or doctoral degree.  Each also requires 2 years of supervised Clinical Experience.  However, a Registered Marriage and Family Therapist’s degree is focused in psychotherapy and family systems.  A Marriage and Family Therapist is trained to treat mental and emotional disorders within the context of marriage, couples and family systems.

You may go to the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) website for more on the qualifications of a Marriage and Family Therapist.

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 4. Must I be married to see a Marriage and Family Therapist?

No. Couples and individuals often seek marriage and family therapy for help with not only relational issues, but behavioral, mental and emotional issues as well.  Family therapists provide similar services as other mental health professionals yet, usually with a more relational orientation.

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5. Can you treat one person with the family therapy process? 

Yes. If one person makes a shift in how they do life, and it is a permanent sift, others in the paradigm will usually respond as well.  That being said, it may be more productive if the couple and/or the family attends the therapy sessions.

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6. Who pays for Registered Marriage and Family Therapist services?

Family therapy services are not covered by OHIP. However, the services of a family therapist are sometimes covered by extended health plans and most employee assistance programs (EAP). You will be provided with a receipt that may be submitted to an insurer for reimbursement. Because some insurers do not offer coverage for marriage and family therapist (MFT), please be sure to find out in advance what your insurer offers and expects from you.  Receipts may be tax deductible.

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 7. How long will therapy take?

The duration of therapy depends on the nature of your concerns and your goals. In general, 6-10 sessions are recommended, although in some circumstances, a longer time spent in therapy is warranted. Depending on the situation, some benefit may be obtained in 3-6 sessions.  It is important to understand, the session in and of itself is not a cure for what is troubling the couple, family or individual.  One must be ready and willing to apply what they take away from the therapy process.

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 8. How do I contact Richard Langston?

You can reach Richard Langston using one of the following ways:

  • Fill out the Contact link
  • Call directly at 905-488-7755 to find out more or to book an appointment.

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9.  Find a Therapist in you area.

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10. Search for additional resources on family therapy and other family-related issues.

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